World’s 20,000th Species of Bee Identified

When people think of bees, they usually think of the humble Bumble or Honey Bee, but in fact there are only around 250 species of the former, and an even smaller 10 species of the latter. Nike Air Max Thea Dames The vast majority of the other approximately 19,700 species of bees come in all shapes, sizes and colours, some of which we’ve mentioned before.

Now an article published in Auckland by an Ontario-based researcher has identified 21 more, pushing the world’s total known bee species past the 20,000 mark. All the newly identified species belong to the genus Mexalictus, which are mostly found in high elevations between Arizona and Panama, asics gel nimbus mujer with some being discovered in Guatemala, Honduras, New Balance 1600 damskie and Nicaragua.

<span style="font-family: georgia, nike air max 1 uomo palatino;”>Unlike your common or garden Honey or Bumble Bee, Nike Air Huarache Dames these new species are very rare, some only known to science due to the discovery of one specimen. New Balance 515 hombre Like most other bees found in the world, these new species are likely solitary and nest in the ground or in twig hollows, Nike Air Max 2017 Dames roze however no nests have yet been found. As the researcher Sheila Dumesh says, “Because their habitats are often imperilled from deforestation and climate change, finding them before they become extinct is a race against time.”

<span style="font-family: georgia, chaussures asics homme pas cher palatino;”>Despite not being as well known to the general population as their honey-making cousins, many thousands of other bee species also pollinate plants and crops. York bee lab leader Professor Laurence Packer explains, “Documenting what these wild bee species are and what they do, as well as understanding their role in agriculture and our planet’s overall ecology is all extremely important.”

 

~ Mr B

via York University.