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Quick Tip: Crystallised Honey

It may seem like a very simple and obvious thing to say, but you’d be surprised at just how much honey is thrown out when it’s perfectly edible. Some people mistakenly think that because honey has crystallised it has somehow gone off but this couldn’t be further from the truth. So what is actually happening when honey crystallises and what can be done about it?

There are a few reasons why honey can crystallise, but the most common ones likely to affect the honey in your kitchen are moisture content and temperature.

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  • To put it simply, honey is basically a concoction of sugar and a little water, and such a low moisture environment discourages bacteria from growing (which is the key to its longevity as we recently posted). Goedkoop Nike Air Max 2017 However, such a dry environment means crystallisation is likely to occur.

    If honey is stored in a very warm environment, it will generally take longer for the process to occur, however the honey may not retain all of its original goodness for as long. But stored in slightly too cool an environment and crystallisation will begin much sooner. Boston Celtics The ideal temperature to store honey is generally considered to be around 21°C (70°F).

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  • Since honey normally exists below its melting point, it is a supercooled liquid, and at very low temperatures, honey will not freeze solid. Instead, as the temperatures become colder, the viscosity of honey increases, and below 5°C (41°F), the honey will not crystallise at all, so the original texture and flavor can be preserved indefinitely. Soldes Chaussures Asics Even shaking the honey can affect the crystallisation process, with crystal nuclei (seeds) tending to form more readily if the honey is disturbed rather than if left at rest.

    So is crystallisation bad for honey? Basically, no. Jarrett Lee – LSU Tigers In fact honey producers, The Apiary included, need to crystallise some of our honey in order to create products like our Creamed Clover Honey. New Balance 997 damskie It’s done by using a method of controlled crystallization, whereby honey is alternately cooled and heated in order to produce that rich and creamy honey you’re probably more likely to have on your toast. adidas yeezy boost 350 hombre Our Raw and Unheated Honey is unprocessed and so in its natural state remains perfectly runny and yummy, but if left in too cool a place will begin to crystallise, however fear not as it’s still perfectly enjoyable.

    If you open your larder one day and find that your honey has crystallised, there are a few things you can do.

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  • First off, you could try using it as an even simpler facial mask recipe idea than our three recipe facial mask we mentioned recently; the crystals will help with exfoliation and the anti-bacterial properties of the honey will soothe the skin.

    But really, honey is best enjoyed when eaten, so if you want it reverted back to its natural runny state then you can either place the jar in a bowl of hot water for five to ten minutes, or for an even quicker solution, pop it in the microwave for about 30 seconds. Note, one other benefit to using glass jars, as well as their upcycling potential, is that it rules out any possibility of anything leaching out of a plastic container into your food when microwaved, albeit a very small possibility.

    Here’s another handy tip we’ve found on our many years of enjoying honey, for those of us who like it in our tea or coffee instead of sugar. Nike Air Max 2017 Heren wit If you’re down to the last of your honey then simply pour in some of the hot water you’re going to use for your cuppa into the jar. Pop the lid on, give it a good shake, then pour it out into your tea. It’s an easy way to both rinse out your jar while wasting as little honey as possible.

    Autumn Detox Salad

    As health is part of our motto it’s important to remember that while honey makes for tasty treats, it’s also perfect for dressing up a healthy detox salad.

    Here is a great looking recipe we found on our internet travels recently, you could get creative and substitute the Brussel sprouts for something like raw cabbage but why pass up the opportunity to be adventurous with food? The recipe calls for maple syrup but a friend of mine who gave this a go assures me that a drizzle of our raw honey did just the trick, and considering it is quite hard to come by actual maple syrup in NZ rather than the flavoured corn syrup kind it’s probably a better idea too.

    Ingredients:

    • 400 grams brussels sprouts (about 18), washed and stems removed
    • 280 grams carrots (about 2 large), peeled
    • 1 apple, diced (I used Honeycrisp)
    • 1 large celery stalk, diced
    • 1/2 cup sunflower seeds
    • 4-6 tbsp raisins
    • 2-4 tbsp fresh lemon juice, to taste
    • 1/4 tsp fine grain sea salt or Herbamare, or to taste
    • 1 tsp fresh Thyme leaves (optional), or other herbs of choice
    • Pure maple syrup, to taste (or Davidson’s Raw and Unheated Honey!)

    Autumn Detox Salad

     

    1. Add the grate/shred blade to food processor. Turn machine on and drop in the brussels sprouts to shred. Now drop in the carrots to shred. Alternatively, you can finely chop brussels and shred carrots with a hand-held grater. Transfer to a large mixing bowl.

    2. Stir in the diced apple, celery, sunflower seeds, and raisins into the carrot and brussels sprout mixture.

    3. Add lemon juice, salt, pepper, and optional fresh thyme to taste. Add a small amount of maple sryup (about 1/2-1.5 tsp) to take the edge off the lemon juice. Sprinkle with cinnamon if desired. Serve & enjoy!

    Autumn Detox Salad Recipe via Oh She Glows.

    ~Mrs B

    Super Easy Flax Honey Oat Biscuits

    Honey Oat Biscuits – Simple, easy, yummy and with a little added sweetness they are quick to prepare and even make a good snack for kids and toddlers. Plain honey can be substituted for flax honey but with the extra nutritional benefits of flax meal I highly recommend it. You may also omit the added sugar altogether and use an extra tablespoon of honey instead, however this will result in a softer biscuit.

     

    Ingredients:

    • 150g softened butter or margarine
    • 1/4 cup sugar
    • 4 tablespoons Davidson’s Organic Honey with Flax
    • 1 cup plain flour
    • 1 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats

     

    Method:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Cream butter/marg, sugar and honey together until well mixed.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Sift together the flour, cinnamon and baking powder and add to the mixture along with rolled oats, stir until well mixed.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Roll mixture into balls using roughly one heaped tablespoon for each, squish onto a greased oven tray with a fork or clean hands.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Bake at 180°C (350°F) for 20 minutes or until golden.

    Allow to cool on wire rack.

    Makes about 15 depending on the size of your biscuits

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Enjoy!

     
    ~Mrs B